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Wise words from Working Girl May 19, 2009

Posted by britlovesbooks in Uncategorized.
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Are you the person you want to be?

Life pushes people in and out, toward and away from the things they always wanted. Working Girl’s advice steps out of the career realm and into life when she says it’s never too late to start down a new path.

To find your true path, consider writing a mission statement to narrow down your wants and desires, your unique purpose in life.

List out your talents and values, and then come up with the kind of life that would allow you to use and work toward them. Create for yourself a goal of what you want to be doing and by what time in your life. Then create steps you can take toward reaching your goal. Then keep working toward it, but don’t be afraid if your goals change as time goes by. Your path in life can change drastically with the way your life changes.

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What Working Girl did for me May 19, 2009

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As a college student ready to graduate, but with no real path except to hopefully become a successful writer one day, Karen Burns’ The Amazing Adventures of Working Girl really appealed to me. Amid all the questions coming my way—What are your plans after graduation, do you have a job lined up yet?, which unnerve me because I have no answer except for the evasive Get a job, I guess, or I’m still looking—Karen Burns’ real life career advice made me much less anxious about my career prospects after college.

After reading about Working Girl’s adventures working 59 jobs in 40 years, I no longer feel like I have to start at the bottom of some corporate ladder straight out of college. I don’t have to be something specific yet. I have time to find my own path—and I don’t feel bad that I will probably start out working in a field far from my fiction-writing focused education. I was reminded that it’s more important that you love your job than anything else, not matter what it is.

Karen Burns also helps with less existential problems. She breaks down the interview process into its essential parts, making it much less daunting in the process. She provides crucial job hunting tips—like the fact that you need a resume to get a job, even though the resume itself will not get you hired, and emphasizes the importance of networking and connecting with people at any job or function, which keeps your options open and can help you hook up with other opportunities down the line.

One of the things that really appealed to me about this book was that the advice is for anyone—it could be used by a corporate ladder climber, a job-hopping teen, or anyone in between. It hands out universal advice that everyone can use.

Thanks, Working Girl, for helping me to realize this incredible truth!

See this wonderful review in Publisher’s Weekly May 6, 2009

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“Her credentials are nonetheless impressive,” says the Publishers Weekly review of Working Girl. ” With a seemingly endless supply of experiences, Burns unveils a flurry of short pieces, each designed to illuminate a single point in the galaxy of employment options, obstacles, aggravations, and accidents.” 

For those who want more, go here and scroll half way down:
http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA6649190.html

Cool, huh?

I like it because it’s advice I can actually use… May 4, 2009

Posted by penmaker in Uncategorized.
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My 19-year-old daughter examined my copy of Working Girl over the weekend and that is what she exclaimed as she rushed out the door Sunday night, back to Western Washington University in Bellingham. She makes this trip each weekend with a carload of other students who also go home for the weekend in Spanaway, Washington. She is currently looking for a summer job in Pullman; she will be a Cougar in the fall. This book answered some of her resume and interview questions. She enjoyed the fun and lighthearted pictures, and because each chapter is short and to the point, she did not have to wade through the whole book for what she was looking for. Karen, you have a winner!

Flyer design update May 4, 2009

Posted by mariacivita in Uncategorized.
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I have been working on the flyer design, and playing with the design a bit, and also I did ask our professor on some advice on how to make the poster better. Along with the flyer, I have been inputting information for the e-newsletter, and the e-newsletter seems to be going well, and will be done except for some small last minute changes our group can do together. Thanks for reading.

Why I bought Working Girl … May 4, 2009

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As a returning student, I am also preparing to re-enter the work force now that my children are grown. This book by Karen Burns is full of advice I wish I had many years ago when I faced difficulties at work. In addition, her advice will help me in a couple years from now when I have completed college. “Weaving Your Web” talks about networking, something I knew nothing about, and “Out of Your Comfort Zone” includes the wisdom of her Eternal Truths (another cool feature of this book!). Lastly, this book brings back fond memories of my many jobs, some of which we have in common (teaching English, digging ditches)! The illustrations are delightful and inspiring, too. Maybe someday, I will learn to draw–a secret aspiration of mine . . .

Hello world! May 3, 2009

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We are three Pacific Lutheran University students who have chosen to publicize Karen Burns’ book, The Amazing Adventures of Working Girl: Real Life Career Advice You Can Actually Use. In our Publishing Procedures class, we are learning the Adobe products InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Dreamweaver–all in one month! We hope to promote this book for young teen girls–or women of any age. Getting your first job? Re-entering the work force? Changing jobs? This book is for you! FYI, all illustrations are by Karen Burns and can be found in her book.